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Bishop calls for end to “systemic sexism, misogyny and misuse of power” in the church

Posted on: January 23, 2018 4:21 PM
The Rape of Tamar by Amnon, depicted here by artist Alexandre Cabanel, is “a Bible story devoid of justice”, the Presiding Bishop of the US-based Episcopal Church, Michael Curry, said in a letter co-signed by the the president of the province’s House of Deputies, the Revd Gay Clark Jennings.
Photo Credit: Bibliotheque Nationale de France
Related Categories: Advocacy, apjn, gender violence, iawn, USA, women

The church “must examine its history and come to a fuller understanding of how it has handled or mishandled cases of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse through the years,” the Presiding Bishop of the US-based Episcopal Church, Michael Curry has said. In a letter to the Church, co-signed by the Revd Gay Clark Jennings, the president of the province’s House of Deputies, Bishop Curry said that recent high profile events have forced societies “into fresh recognition that women in all walks of life have suffered unspoken trauma at the hands of male aggressors and harassers.” In their letter, the church leaders say that they “have become convinced that the Episcopal Church must work even harder to create a church that is not simply safe, but holy, humane and decent.”

The letter begins with a reference to the “compelling testimony from women who have been sexually harassed and assaulted by powerful men”; and said that this has turned their minds to “a particularly difficult passage of holy scripture: the story of the rape of King David’s daughter Tamar by her half-brother Amnon” in 2 Samuel 13: 1-22.

“It is a passage in which a conspiracy of men plots the exploitation and rape of a young woman. She is stripped of the power to speak or act, her father ignores the crime, and the fate of the rapist, not the victim, is mourned. It is a Bible story devoid of justice.” They point to the manual published by the Tamar Campaign which, for more than 20 years, has helped African women from marginalised communities study the passage “to explore and speak about the trauma of sexual assault in their own lives,” leading them to ask: “What can the Church do to break the silence against gender-based violence?”

Curry and Jennings say that the Church “must commit to treating every person as a child of God, deserving of dignity and respect. We must also commit to ending the systemic sexism, misogyny and misuse of power that plague the church just as they corrupt our culture, institutions and governments.

“Like our African siblings in faith, we must create contexts in which women can speak of their unspoken trauma, whether suffered within the church or elsewhere. And we must do more.

“Our church must examine its history and come to a fuller understanding of how it has handled or mishandled cases of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse through the years. When facts dictate, we must confess and repent of those times when the church, its ministers or its members have been antagonistic or unresponsive to people – women, children and men – who have been sexually exploited or abused. And we must acknowledge that in our church and in our culture, the sexual exploitation of women is part of the same unjust system that also causes gender gaps in pay, promotion, health and empowerment.”

They call for “collective repentance” and says that “each of us has a role to play,” adding: “And so, today, we invite you to join us in an Ash Wednesday Day of Prayer on February 14 devoted to meditating on the ways in which we in the church have failed to stand with women and other victims of abuse and harassment and to consider, as part of our Lenten disciplines, how we can redouble our work to be communities of safety that stand against the spiritual and physical violence of sexual exploitation and abuse.

“Neither of us professes to have all of the wisdom necessary to change the culture of our church and the society in which it ministers, and at this summer’s General Convention, we want to hear the voice of the wider church as we determine how to proceed in both atoning for the church’s past and shaping a more just future. May we find in our deliberations opportunities to listen to one another, to be honest about our own failings and brokenness, and to discern prayerfully the ways that God is calling us to stand with Tamar in all of the places we find her – both inside the church and beyond our doors, which we have too often used to shut her out.”