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Anglican Communion leaders identify needs for Companion Link relationships

Posted on: May 22, 2015 12:51 PM
Bishop Jane Alexander and the Revd Yohana Mtokambali at St Alban’s Cathedral in Dar es Salaam
Photo Credit: John Kafwanka

By ACNS staff

Mission-centred relationship and openness about the challenges faced in both the global north and global south of the Anglican Communion were the key needs identified in the Companion Link consultation involving 25 Anglican/Episcopalian leaders from 11 dioceses in Canada, Ghana, South Sudan and Tanzania that took place in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, on 14-17 May.

Companion or Church links are relationships among Anglican Communion churches that agree to work together to enhance their local and global mission by sharing resources, exchange visits, work and cultural experience. “Companion Link relationships should become the heartbeat of each diocese,” Archbishop Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada pointed out at the Tanzania meeting.

Meanwhile, political instability in the country prevented Burundi Anglican leaders from two dioceses and their Primate from participating in the consultation. Those who gathered expressed profound sadness and solidarity with their counterparts and the whole nation, and prayed for peace and co-existence among Burundians and the ability to settle differences and remain united.

The delegates discussed Companion Link achievements and areas for improvement to enhance cooperation among companion dioceses and parishes. The meeting provided an opportunity for the dioceses to know more about each other’s work and develop even closer partnerships.

Diocesan bishops shared personal stories of mission experience lived out in their contexts and across Companion Links. Bishop Jane Alexander from the Diocese of Edmonton in Canada talked of a church partnership with the local government to end poverty and homelessness, and highlighted the diocese’s vision to deal with the challenge to keep youth and young people in the church beyond confirmation.

Bishop Wilson Kamani of the Diocese of Iba in South Sudan talked about the high illiteracy levels and the role of the church in providing education, pointing out that the first school in the area was started by the church in 2007. Bishop Kamani also highlighted the vision for self-sustainability where more locally educated people and infrastructure support the work of the diocese so there is less need to depend on support from outside.

Leaders from 11 Companion Links dioceses in Canada, Ghana, South Sudan and Tanzania met in Dar es Salaam on 14-17 May
Leaders from 11 Companion Links dioceses in Canada, Ghana, South Sudan and Tanzania met in Dar es Salaam on 14-17 May
Photo Credit: Isaac Kawuki Mukasa

Some of the areas identified for future cooperation included regular communication of good practice stories and information as well as the crucial role of personal visits and exchange of theology students and young people to break down misconceptions and learning from each other’s culture.

Speaking at the meeting, the Revd John Kafwanka, Director for Mission of the Anglican Communion Office, implored the delegates to look at Companion Link as a means of "serving together" as disciples of Jesus Christ. “Companion Link provides a platform for common witness to Christ’s love in God's world, expressed through the common voice, vision, mission, and unity of purpose in a world that is so divided by sin,” he said.

Mr Kafwanka also pointed out: "The Five Marks of Mission provides an avenue in which Companion Links can be intentional in serving together as partners in mission, and as global disciples.”