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400 Christians to attend ecumenical gathering in Hungary

Posted on: July 2, 2013 2:14 PM
European Christians will be reforging their relationships at the meeting in Hungary
Photo Credit: CEC/CSC Archives
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From The Lusitanian Church 
 
About 400 Christians from all over Europe and from a range of different denominations are gathering in Budapest, Hungary, next week (3-8 July) for the 14th Assembly of the Conference of European Churches (CEC).

The Assembly is to be a place of meeting, deliberation and prayer where partners will chart the future of ecumencial fellowship and co-operation in Europe.

Under the theme And now what are you waiting for? (Acts 22:16) and in the context of a changing Europe, participants are seeking to build a new vision and mission for CEC. This will be achieved by, among other things, voting on the text of a new constitution which will reform the existing structures of the organisation.

CEC comprises some 120 Orthodox, Protestant, Anglican and Old Catholic Churches, plus 40 associated organisations from mainland Europe.

Important in the development of its mission has been dialogue and ecumenical work with the Roman Catholic Church through the Council of European Bishops' Conferences. Both organisations produced the Ecumenical Charter and together promoted the European Ecumenical Assemblies of Basel (1989), Gratz (1997) and Sibiu (2007).

Attendees from Portugal at this meeting will include leaders of the Lusitanian Church (Anglican Communion), the Portuguese Evangelical Methodist Church and the Evangelical Presbyterian Church of Portugal, churches that constitute the Portuguese Council of Christian Churches (COPIC).

For more information about the Assembly visit: http://assembly2013.ceceurope.org/index.php?id=1173 

ENDS

[Editor's note: The Lusitanian Church is extra-provincial to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Anglicans have been living and worshipping in Hungary since at least the late 1800s.]